A Mortgage Rate Strategy Ahead Of Friday's Jobs Report

Estimated NFP results September 2009

Mortgage rates are prepped to make big moves in the next 36 hours. Is it time for you to call in your rate lock?

Friday, at 8:30 AM ET, the Bureau of Labor Statistics will release the Non-Farm Payrolls report for September. Issued monthly, the “jobs report” offers sector-by-sector job creation figures from the month prior, and reports on the national Unemployment Rate.

Last month, exactly zero net new jobs were created, the government said. This month, economists expect a net 60,000 new jobs created.

Depending on where the actual monthly figure falls, FHA and conforming mortgage rates may be volatile. The jobs reports tends to have out-sized influence on the mortgage bond market.

The connection between the jobs market and the mortgage market is fairly straight-forward. As jobs go, so goes the economy. This is because more working Americans leads to a stronger economic base.

  1. When more people work, consumer spending grows
  2. When more people work, governments collect more taxes
  3. When more people work, household savings increases

Each of these items are strengths to a recovering economy.

For rate shoppers, Friday’s job report could cause mortgage rates to rise — or fall. If the actual number of jobs created exceeded the 60,000 consensus estimate, look for mortgage rates to climb.

Conversely, if new jobs fell short of 60,000, expect that rates will drop.

Home affordability is at all-time highs because mortgage rates are at all-time lows. If you’re under contract for a home or looking to refinance, eliminate some of your interest rate risk. Lock ahead of Friday’s Non-Farm Payrolls release.

Get your rate lock in today.

A Mortgage Rate Strategy Ahead Of Friday’s Jobs Report

Estimated NFP results September 2009

Mortgage rates are prepped to make big moves in the next 36 hours. Is it time for you to call in your rate lock?

Friday, at 8:30 AM ET, the Bureau of Labor Statistics will release the Non-Farm Payrolls report for September. Issued monthly, the “jobs report” offers sector-by-sector job creation figures from the month prior, and reports on the national Unemployment Rate.

Last month, exactly zero net new jobs were created, the government said. This month, economists expect a net 60,000 new jobs created.

Depending on where the actual monthly figure falls, FHA and conforming mortgage rates may be volatile. The jobs reports tends to have out-sized influence on the mortgage bond market.

The connection between the jobs market and the mortgage market is fairly straight-forward. As jobs go, so goes the economy. This is because more working Americans leads to a stronger economic base.

  1. When more people work, consumer spending grows
  2. When more people work, governments collect more taxes
  3. When more people work, household savings increases

Each of these items are strengths to a recovering economy.

For rate shoppers, Friday’s job report could cause mortgage rates to rise — or fall. If the actual number of jobs created exceeded the 60,000 consensus estimate, look for mortgage rates to climb.

Conversely, if new jobs fell short of 60,000, expect that rates will drop.

Home affordability is at all-time highs because mortgage rates are at all-time lows. If you’re under contract for a home or looking to refinance, eliminate some of your interest rate risk. Lock ahead of Friday’s Non-Farm Payrolls release.

Get your rate lock in today.

What's Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : September 6, 2011

Eurozone debt concerns resurfaceMortgage markets improved last week on a weak jobs report, expectation for new market stimulus, growing evidence of a global economic slowdown. Rates were especially volatile, too, with the long Labor Day Weekend looming.

Overall, conforming mortgage rates in Ohio improved for the first time in 3 weeks. On a product-by-product basis, though, mortgage rates are faring differently.

According to the Freddie Mac weekly mortgage rate survey, last week, the 30-year fixed rate mortgage was unchanged but the 15-year fixed rate mortgage and the 5-year ARM fell.

The 5-year ARM is at a new all-time low for qualified borrowers.

A drop in 5-year ARM rates without a corresponding drop in 30-year fixed mortgage rates signals that markets expect the economy to stabilize over the long-term but with weakness in the near-term. The 5-year ARM’s ultra-low rates suggests marked weakness ahead.

The 5-year ARM may get another boost this week, too.

While U.S. markets were closed for Labor Day, Eurozone nations were hit with new wave of sovereign debt concern, this time centered on Italy. Greece, Portugal and Ireland have already been the subject of debt default debate this year. Italy’s inclusion hit equity market hard and safe-haven buying re-commenced.

This should give a good start to mortgage rates this week. Look for rates to start lower. That’s not to say, however, that they’ll finish the week lower. With very little economic data due for release, markets will move on momentum and momentum can change in a flash.

The two biggest potential market movers both come Thursday. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks in Minnesota at 1:00 PM, and United States President Barack Obama addresses the nation at 7:00 PM. Both speeches are highly anticipated and should cause markets to move.

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : September 6, 2011

Eurozone debt concerns resurfaceMortgage markets improved last week on a weak jobs report, expectation for new market stimulus, growing evidence of a global economic slowdown. Rates were especially volatile, too, with the long Labor Day Weekend looming.

Overall, conforming mortgage rates in Ohio improved for the first time in 3 weeks. On a product-by-product basis, though, mortgage rates are faring differently.

According to the Freddie Mac weekly mortgage rate survey, last week, the 30-year fixed rate mortgage was unchanged but the 15-year fixed rate mortgage and the 5-year ARM fell.

The 5-year ARM is at a new all-time low for qualified borrowers.

A drop in 5-year ARM rates without a corresponding drop in 30-year fixed mortgage rates signals that markets expect the economy to stabilize over the long-term but with weakness in the near-term. The 5-year ARM’s ultra-low rates suggests marked weakness ahead.

The 5-year ARM may get another boost this week, too.

While U.S. markets were closed for Labor Day, Eurozone nations were hit with new wave of sovereign debt concern, this time centered on Italy. Greece, Portugal and Ireland have already been the subject of debt default debate this year. Italy’s inclusion hit equity market hard and safe-haven buying re-commenced.

This should give a good start to mortgage rates this week. Look for rates to start lower. That’s not to say, however, that they’ll finish the week lower. With very little economic data due for release, markets will move on momentum and momentum can change in a flash.

The two biggest potential market movers both come Thursday. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks in Minnesota at 1:00 PM, and United States President Barack Obama addresses the nation at 7:00 PM. Both speeches are highly anticipated and should cause markets to move.

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : August 29, 2011

Net new jobs August 2009-July 2011Last week was another volatile week for mortgage rates. Wall Street alternately sought risk and shunned it, causing mortgage-backed bonds to rise and fall rapidly.

There was a lot to move markets, too, including banking concerns across Europe, inflation figures within the U.S., and a public speech by Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke.

Conforming rates in Florida rose to their highest levels of the week Wednesday afternoon, then receded into the weekend. 3

0-year fixed rates remain above their all-time lows set 2 weeks ago. 5-year ARMs are at all-time lows.

This week, mortgage rates figure to be equally jumpy. As well as a full slate of economic data, because of Labor Day, bond markets will be light on volume. When volume is light, pricing gets volatile.

The week’s calendar of data includes:

  • Monday : Pending Home Sales Index; Personal Income and Outlays
  • Tuesday : FOMC Minutes; Fed President Kocherlakota speaks
  • Wednesday : Factory Orders
  • Thursday : Jobless Claims; ISM Manufacturing Index
  • Friday : Non-Farm Payrolls

Of all the reports, though, it’s Friday’s Non-Farm Payrolls that might move mortgage markets the most.

Jobs are crucial to the ongoing economic recovery and, from Wall Street to Capitol Hill, it’s top of mind.

If the jobs report shows more jobs created than expected, or a positive forward trend, expect bond markets to fall, pushing mortgage rates up. On the other hand, if the jobs report is soft, mortgage rates may improve.

We can’t know what rates will do on any given day, so the best strategy for a shopper is to shop with purpose. Know what you want, and be ready to lock when you see it. 

If you wait too long, the rate will be gone.

What's Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : August 29, 2011

Net new jobs August 2009-July 2011Last week was another volatile week for mortgage rates. Wall Street alternately sought risk and shunned it, causing mortgage-backed bonds to rise and fall rapidly.

There was a lot to move markets, too, including banking concerns across Europe, inflation figures within the U.S., and a public speech by Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke.

Conforming rates in Florida rose to their highest levels of the week Wednesday afternoon, then receded into the weekend. 3

0-year fixed rates remain above their all-time lows set 2 weeks ago. 5-year ARMs are at all-time lows.

This week, mortgage rates figure to be equally jumpy. As well as a full slate of economic data, because of Labor Day, bond markets will be light on volume. When volume is light, pricing gets volatile.

The week’s calendar of data includes:

  • Monday : Pending Home Sales Index; Personal Income and Outlays
  • Tuesday : FOMC Minutes; Fed President Kocherlakota speaks
  • Wednesday : Factory Orders
  • Thursday : Jobless Claims; ISM Manufacturing Index
  • Friday : Non-Farm Payrolls

Of all the reports, though, it’s Friday’s Non-Farm Payrolls that might move mortgage markets the most.

Jobs are crucial to the ongoing economic recovery and, from Wall Street to Capitol Hill, it’s top of mind.

If the jobs report shows more jobs created than expected, or a positive forward trend, expect bond markets to fall, pushing mortgage rates up. On the other hand, if the jobs report is soft, mortgage rates may improve.

We can’t know what rates will do on any given day, so the best strategy for a shopper is to shop with purpose. Know what you want, and be ready to lock when you see it. 

If you wait too long, the rate will be gone.